Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fey
 
Pronunciation: /fay/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Marked by a foreboding of death or calamity
2) Marked by an otherworldly air or attitude
3) Crazy, touched
4) Excessively refined : precious
5) Quaintly unconventional : campy
6) Having supernatural powers of clairvoyance
 
Etymology: Old English fǣge (in the sense ‘fated to die soon’).

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Drupe
 
Pronunciation: /droop/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) Any fruit, as a peach, cherry, plum, etc., consisting of an outer skin, a usually pulpy and succulent middle layer, and a hard and woody inner shell usually enclosing a single seed.
 
Etymology: mid 18th century: from Latin drupa ‘overripe olive,’ from Greek druppa ‘olive.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Extrude
 
Pronunciation: \ik-ˈstrüd\
 
Defintion: (verb)
 
1) Form or shape by forcing through an opening.
2) Thrust or force out.
3) Expel.
4) To shape (a substance, such as metal or plastic) by forcing through a die.
 
Etymology: mid 16th century: from Latin extrudere, from ex- ‘out’ + trudere ‘to thrust.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Perfidious
 
Pronunciation: /pərˈfidēəs/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Deceitful and untrustworthy
2) Deliberately faithless
3) Treacherous
 
Etymology: Late 16th century: from Latin perfidiosus, from perfidia ‘treachery.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Sybaritic
 
Pronunciation: /sib-uh-RIT-ik/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Devoted to or relating to luxury and pleasure.
2) Self-indulgent.
3) Of, relating to, or characteristic of Sybaris or its inhabitants.
 
Etymology: After Sybaris, an ancient Greek city in southern Italy noted for its wealth, whose residents were notorious for their love of luxury. Earliest documented use: 1619.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bucolic
 
Pronunciation: /byoo-KAH-lik/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) of or relating to shepherds or herdsmen : pastoral
2) relating to or typical of rural life
3) pleasing or picturesque in natural simplicity : idyllic
 
Etymology: early 16th century (denoting a pastoral poem): via Latin from Greek boukolikos, from boukolos ‘herdsman,’ from bous ‘ox.’