Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Extrude
 
Pronunciation: \ik-ˈstrüd\
 
Defintion: (verb)
 
1) Form or shape by forcing through an opening.
2) Thrust or force out.
3) Expel.
4) To shape (a substance, such as metal or plastic) by forcing through a die.
 
Etymology: mid 16th century: from Latin extrudere, from ex- ‘out’ + trudere ‘to thrust.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Snaffle
 
Pronunciation: /SNAFF-ul/
 
Definition: (verb, noun)
 
1) to obtain especially by devious or irregular means.
2) take (something) for oneself, typically quickly or without permission.
3) (on a bridle) a simple bit, typically a jointed one, used with a single set of reins.
 
Etymology: mid 16th century (denoting a bridle bit): probably from Low German or Dutch; compare with Middle Low German and Middle Dutch snavel ‘beak, mouth’ The verb (mid 19th century) is perhaps a different word.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Coze
 
Pronunciation: /kohz/
 
Definition: (noun, verb)
 
1) a friendly talk; a chat.
2) to converse in a friendly way; chat.
3) an intimate friendly chat
4) a state of comfort and warmth
5) to chat in an intimate and friendly manner
 
Etymology: Coze came to English in the 1820s from French causer “to chat,” from Old French “to reason, expound.” Ultimately coze derives from Latin causārī “to plead a cause, plead as an excuse.”

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Besmirch
Pronunciation: /bih-SMERCH/
 
Definition: (verb)
 
1) to cause harm or damage to : sully, soil
2) damage the reputation of (someone or something) in the opinion of others
3) to soil; tarnish; discolor
4) to detract from the honor or luster of
 
Etymology: Early 17th century: from be- + smirch.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fress

Pronunciation: (fres)

Definition: (verb)

1) to eat or snack, especially often or in large quantities.
2) eat a lot and without restraint

Etymology: Yiddish fresn or German fressen (of animals) to eat, eat ravenously;

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fulminate
 
Pronunciation: \ˈfu̇l-mə-ˌnāt, ˈfəl-\
 
Definition: (verb)
 
1) to issue denunciations or the like (usually followed by against): The minister fulminated against legalized vice.
 
2) to explode with a loud noise; detonate.
 
3) to cause to explode.
 
Etymology: Fulminate is formed from fulminat-, the stem of fulminātus, the past participle of the Latin verb fulmināre “to hurl thunderbolts, thunder.” The classical Latin forms keep close to the literal sense, sometimes adding a sense “to blast with lightning.” The new senses “to issue denunciations, formally condemn; to thunder threats; to excommunicate” arise and become frequent in English in the 12th century. The chemical sense originated in French in the 19th century.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Etiolate
 
Definition: (verb)
 
1) to cause to become weakened or sickly; drain of color or vigor.
2) to cause (a plant) to whiten or grow pale by excluding light: to etiolate celery.
3) (of plants) to whiten or grow pale through lack of light.
 
Etymology:
 
Etiolate comes from the French verb étioler “to make pale, etiolate (plants),” probably derivative of a Norman French dialect form of standard French éteule, from Old French estoble, estuble “stubble,” from Latin stipula “stalk, straw.” The word entered English in the 18th century.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Lunt
 
Definition: (noun,verb)
 
1. a match; the flame used to light a fire.
2. smoke or steam, especially smoke from a tobacco pipe.
3. to emit smoke or steam.
4. to smoke a pipe.
5. to kindle (a fire).
6. to light (a pipe, torch, etc.).
7. to smoke (a pipe).
 
Etymology: 1540-50; < Dutch lont match, fuse; akin to Middle Low German lunte match, wick