Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Extrude
 
Pronunciation: \ik-ˈstrüd\
 
Defintion: (verb)
 
1) Form or shape by forcing through an opening.
2) Thrust or force out.
3) Expel.
4) To shape (a substance, such as metal or plastic) by forcing through a die.
 
Etymology: mid 16th century: from Latin extrudere, from ex- ‘out’ + trudere ‘to thrust.’
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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Snaffle
 
Pronunciation: /SNAFF-ul/
 
Definition: (verb, noun)
 
1) to obtain especially by devious or irregular means.
2) take (something) for oneself, typically quickly or without permission.
3) (on a bridle) a simple bit, typically a jointed one, used with a single set of reins.
 
Etymology: mid 16th century (denoting a bridle bit): probably from Low German or Dutch; compare with Middle Low German and Middle Dutch snavel ‘beak, mouth’ The verb (mid 19th century) is perhaps a different word.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Coze
 
Pronunciation: /kohz/
 
Definition: (noun, verb)
 
1) a friendly talk; a chat.
2) to converse in a friendly way; chat.
3) an intimate friendly chat
4) a state of comfort and warmth
5) to chat in an intimate and friendly manner
 
Etymology: Coze came to English in the 1820s from French causer “to chat,” from Old French “to reason, expound.” Ultimately coze derives from Latin causārī “to plead a cause, plead as an excuse.”

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Besmirch
Pronunciation: /bih-SMERCH/
 
Definition: (verb)
 
1) to cause harm or damage to : sully, soil
2) damage the reputation of (someone or something) in the opinion of others
3) to soil; tarnish; discolor
4) to detract from the honor or luster of
 
Etymology: Early 17th century: from be- + smirch.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fress

Pronunciation: (fres)

Definition: (verb)

1) to eat or snack, especially often or in large quantities.
2) eat a lot and without restraint

Etymology: Yiddish fresn or German fressen (of animals) to eat, eat ravenously;

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fulminate
 
Pronunciation: \ˈfu̇l-mə-ˌnāt, ˈfəl-\
 
Definition: (verb)
 
1) to issue denunciations or the like (usually followed by against): The minister fulminated against legalized vice.
 
2) to explode with a loud noise; detonate.
 
3) to cause to explode.
 
Etymology: Fulminate is formed from fulminat-, the stem of fulminātus, the past participle of the Latin verb fulmināre “to hurl thunderbolts, thunder.” The classical Latin forms keep close to the literal sense, sometimes adding a sense “to blast with lightning.” The new senses “to issue denunciations, formally condemn; to thunder threats; to excommunicate” arise and become frequent in English in the 12th century. The chemical sense originated in French in the 19th century.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Etiolate
 
Definition: (verb)
 
1) to cause to become weakened or sickly; drain of color or vigor.
2) to cause (a plant) to whiten or grow pale by excluding light: to etiolate celery.
3) (of plants) to whiten or grow pale through lack of light.
 
Etymology:
 
Etiolate comes from the French verb étioler “to make pale, etiolate (plants),” probably derivative of a Norman French dialect form of standard French éteule, from Old French estoble, estuble “stubble,” from Latin stipula “stalk, straw.” The word entered English in the 18th century.