Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Puce
 
Pronunciation: /pyoos/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) a dark red or brownish purple color.
2) of a dark or brownish purple.
 
Etymology: late 18th century: from French, literally ‘flea(-color),’ from Latin pulex, pulic- .

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Coze
 
Pronunciation: /kohz/
 
Definition: (noun, verb)
 
1) a friendly talk; a chat.
2) to converse in a friendly way; chat.
3) an intimate friendly chat
4) a state of comfort and warmth
5) to chat in an intimate and friendly manner
 
Etymology: Coze came to English in the 1820s from French causer “to chat,” from Old French “to reason, expound.” Ultimately coze derives from Latin causārī “to plead a cause, plead as an excuse.”

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bobbery
 
Pronunciation: /BOB-uh-ree/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) Squabble; commotion; confusion.
2) A disturbance; brawl.
3) (Hunting) Also called: bobbery pack a mixed pack of hunting dogs, often not belonging to any of the hound breeds
4) a noisy commotion
5) noisy or excitable
 
Etymology: A corruption of Hindi “bap re” (literally, oh father!), an exclamation of surprise, grief, etc., from bap (father) + re (oh). Earliest documented use: 1816.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Miscible
 
Pronunciation: /MIS-uh-buhl/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Capable of being mixed together.
2) (of liquids) forming a homogeneous mixture when added together.
3) capable of mixing in any ratio without separation of two phases.
 
Etymology: From Latin miscere (to mix), ultimately from the Indo-European root meik- (to mix), which is also the source of mix, miscellaneous, meddle, medley, promiscuous, melee, mustang, admix, immix, and panmixia. Earliest documented use: 1570.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bromidic
 
Pronunciation: (broh-MID-ik)
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Commonplace; trite.
2) pertaining or proper to a platitude; being a bromide
3) lacking in originality
4) given to uttering bromides
5) dull and tiresome but with pretensions of significance or originality
 
Etymology: From the former use of bromide compounds as sedatives. Bromine got its name from the Greek bromos (stench) due to its strong smell. Earliest documented use: 1906.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Ort
 
Pronunciation: /awrt/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a scrap or morsel of food left at a meal. Usually, orts.
 
Etymology: Ort entered English in the 1400s. Low German ort and early Dutch oorete are cognates.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Smaragdine
Pronunciation: /smuh-rag-din/
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) emerald-green in color.
2) of or relating to emeralds.
3) Rare. smaragd.
 
Etymology: 1350-1400; Middle English: smaragd < Latin smaragdīnus < Greek smarágdinos, equivalent to smáragd (os) emerald + -inos -ine

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Anthophilous
 
Pronunciation: /anˈTHäfələs/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) attracted by or living among flowers.
2) feeding on flowers, as certain insects.
3) (of insects or other animals) frequenting flowers.
 
Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek anthos + English -philous

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Effulgence
 
Pronunciation: /ih-FULL-junss/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) radiant splendor : brilliance
2) a brilliant radiance; a shining forth.
 
Etymology: Late Latin effulgentia, from Latin effulgent-, effulgens, present participle of effulgēre to shine forth, from ex- + fulgēre to shine — more at fulgent

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Analphabetic
 
Pronunciation: (an-al-fuh-BET-ik)
 
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) Illiterate.
2) Not alphabetical.
3) Representing sounds by composite signs rather than by single letters or symbols.
4) An illiterate person.
 
Etymology: From Greek analphabetos (not knowing the alphabet), from an- (not) + alphabetos (alphabet), from alpha + beta. Earliest documented use: 1876.