Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Drupe
 
Pronunciation: /droop/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) Any fruit, as a peach, cherry, plum, etc., consisting of an outer skin, a usually pulpy and succulent middle layer, and a hard and woody inner shell usually enclosing a single seed.
 
Etymology: mid 18th century: from Latin drupa ‘overripe olive,’ from Greek druppa ‘olive.’
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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Alembic
 
Pronunciation: /uh-LEM-bik
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1. A vessel with a beaked cap or head, an apparatus formerly used in distilling.
2. Something that refines, purifies, or transforms.
 
Etymology: From Old French, from Latin alembicus, from Arabic al-anbiq (the still), from Greek ambix (cup). Earliest documented use: 1405.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Grimalkin
 
Pronunciation: /grih-MAWL-kin/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a domestic cat; especially.
2) an old female cat.
3) a spiteful old woman.
 
Etymology: late 16th century: from gray1 + Malkin (nickname for the given name Matilda ).

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Cramoisy
 
Pronunciation: /KRAM-oi-zee, kruh-MOI-/
 
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) Of a crimson color.
2) Crimson cloth.
 
Etymology: From French cramoisi, from Spanish carmesi, from Arabic qirmizi (of kermes). Earliest documented use: 1423.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Compathy
 
Pronunciation: \ˈkämpəthē\
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) feelings, as happiness or grief, shared with another or others.
2) shared feeling (as of joy or sorrow).
 
Etymology: com + pathy

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Hypozeuxis
 
Pronunciation: /hahy-puh-zook-sis/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) Rhetoric. the use of a series of parallel clauses, each of which has a subject and predicate, as in “I came, I saw, I conquered.”
 
Etymology: 1580-90; < Late Latin < Late Greek, equivalent to Greek hypozeug(nýnai) to put under the yoke ( hypo- hypo- + zeugnýnai to yoke, derivative of zeûgos yoke1) + -sis -sis

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Snaffle
 
Pronunciation: /SNAFF-ul/
 
Definition: (verb, noun)
 
1) to obtain especially by devious or irregular means.
2) take (something) for oneself, typically quickly or without permission.
3) (on a bridle) a simple bit, typically a jointed one, used with a single set of reins.
 
Etymology: mid 16th century (denoting a bridle bit): probably from Low German or Dutch; compare with Middle Low German and Middle Dutch snavel ‘beak, mouth’ The verb (mid 19th century) is perhaps a different word.