Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Gimcrack
 
Pronunciation: /JIM-krak/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) a showy object of little use or value : gewgaw
2) a cheap and showy ornament; a knickknack.
3) flimsy or poorly made but deceptively attractive.
 
Etymology: Middle English gibecrake, of unknown origin. Originally a noun, the term denoted some kind of inlaid work in wood, later a fanciful notion or mechanical contrivance, hence a knickknack.
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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Ort
 
Pronunciation: /awrt/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a scrap or morsel of food left at a meal. Usually, orts.
 
Etymology: Ort entered English in the 1400s. Low German ort and early Dutch oorete are cognates.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Smaragdine
Pronunciation: /smuh-rag-din/
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) emerald-green in color.
2) of or relating to emeralds.
3) Rare. smaragd.
 
Etymology: 1350-1400; Middle English: smaragd < Latin smaragdīnus < Greek smarágdinos, equivalent to smáragd (os) emerald + -inos -ine

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Hemidemisemiquaver
 
Pronunciation: (hem-ee-dem-ee-SEM-ee-kway-vuhr)
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) A sixty-fourth note.
 
Etymology:
 
From Greek hemi- (half) + French demi- (half) + Latin semi- (half) + quaver (an eighth note), from Middle English quaveren (to shake or tremble). Earliest documented use: 1853.