Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Myrmidon
 
Pronunciation: (MUHR-mi-dahn, -duhn)
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) one who unquestioningly follows orders.
2) a member of a warlike Thessalian people led by Achilles at the siege of Troy.
3) a hired ruffian or unscrupulous subordinate.
 
Etymology: In Greek mythology, the Myrmidons were led by Achilles in the Trojan War. The name is possibly from Greek myrmex (ant). In a version of the story, Zeus created Myrmidons from ants. Earliest documented use: 1425.
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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Biennial
 
Pronunciation: \bī-ˈe-nē-əl\
 
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) occurring every second year
2) having a life cycle lasting two seasons
3) an event that occurs every two years
4) (botany) a plant having a life cycle that normally takes two seasons from germination to death to complete; flowering biennials usually bloom and fruit in the second season
 
Etymology: Early 17th century: from Latin biennis (from bi- ‘twice’ + annus ‘year’) + -al.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bourgeois
 
Pronunciation: (boor-ZHWAH, BOOR-zhwah)
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) A member of the middle class.
2) One who exhibits behavior in conformity to the conventions of the middle class.
3) In Marxist theory, a member of the capitalist class.
4) Belonging to the middle class.
5) Marked by a concern for respectability and material interests.
6) Mediocre or unimaginative: lacking artistic refinement.
 
Etymology: From French bourgeois, from Latin burgus (fortress, fortified town), from West Germanic burg. Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhergh- (high) which is also the source of iceberg, belfry, borough, burg, burglar, bourgeois, fortify, and force. Earliest documented use: 1564.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fanfaronade
 
Pronunciation: /ˌfanˌferəˈnād/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) bragging; bravado; bluster.
2) arrogant or boastful talk.
 
Etymology: mid 17th century: from French fanfaronnade, from fanfaron ‘braggart,’ from fanfare

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Gimcrack
 
Pronunciation: /JIM-krak/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) a showy object of little use or value : gewgaw
2) a cheap and showy ornament; a knickknack.
3) flimsy or poorly made but deceptively attractive.
 
Etymology: Middle English gibecrake, of unknown origin. Originally a noun, the term denoted some kind of inlaid work in wood, later a fanciful notion or mechanical contrivance, hence a knickknack.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Aginner
 
Pronunciation: \əˈginə(r)\
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) one who opposes change
2) a person who opposes a plan, proposed legislation, or any drastic change
3) someone who is against something
 
Etymology: 2agin + 2-er; First Known Use: 1905

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Nescience
 
Pronunciation: \ˈne-sh(ē-)ənt, ˈnē-, -sē-ənt\
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) lack of knowledge; ignorance.
2) agnosticism.
 
Etymology: Late Middle English: from Latin nescient- ‘not knowing’, from the verb nescire, from ne- ‘not’ + scire ‘know’.