Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Drupe
 
Pronunciation: /droop/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) Any fruit, as a peach, cherry, plum, etc., consisting of an outer skin, a usually pulpy and succulent middle layer, and a hard and woody inner shell usually enclosing a single seed.
 
Etymology: mid 18th century: from Latin drupa ‘overripe olive,’ from Greek druppa ‘olive.’
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On this Day in History

On this Day in History in 1066: Halley’s Comet sparks English monk to predict country will be destroyed.
 
On this Day in History in 1184 B.C.: The Greeks enter Troy using the Trojan Horse (traditional date).

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bucolic
 
Pronunciation: /byoo-KAH-lik/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) of or relating to shepherds or herdsmen : pastoral
2) relating to or typical of rural life
3) pleasing or picturesque in natural simplicity : idyllic
 
Etymology: early 16th century (denoting a pastoral poem): via Latin from Greek boukolikos, from boukolos ‘herdsman,’ from bous ‘ox.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Alembic
 
Pronunciation: /uh-LEM-bik
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1. A vessel with a beaked cap or head, an apparatus formerly used in distilling.
2. Something that refines, purifies, or transforms.
 
Etymology: From Old French, from Latin alembicus, from Arabic al-anbiq (the still), from Greek ambix (cup). Earliest documented use: 1405.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Hypozeuxis
 
Pronunciation: /hahy-puh-zook-sis/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) Rhetoric. the use of a series of parallel clauses, each of which has a subject and predicate, as in “I came, I saw, I conquered.”
 
Etymology: 1580-90; < Late Latin < Late Greek, equivalent to Greek hypozeug(nýnai) to put under the yoke ( hypo- hypo- + zeugnýnai to yoke, derivative of zeûgos yoke1) + -sis -sis

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Myrmidon
 
Pronunciation: (MUHR-mi-dahn, -duhn)
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) one who unquestioningly follows orders.
2) a member of a warlike Thessalian people led by Achilles at the siege of Troy.
3) a hired ruffian or unscrupulous subordinate.
 
Etymology: In Greek mythology, the Myrmidons were led by Achilles in the Trojan War. The name is possibly from Greek myrmex (ant). In a version of the story, Zeus created Myrmidons from ants. Earliest documented use: 1425.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bromidic
 
Pronunciation: (broh-MID-ik)
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Commonplace; trite.
2) pertaining or proper to a platitude; being a bromide
3) lacking in originality
4) given to uttering bromides
5) dull and tiresome but with pretensions of significance or originality
 
Etymology: From the former use of bromide compounds as sedatives. Bromine got its name from the Greek bromos (stench) due to its strong smell. Earliest documented use: 1906.