Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Smaragdine
Pronunciation: /smuh-rag-din/
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) emerald-green in color.
2) of or relating to emeralds.
3) Rare. smaragd.
 
Etymology: 1350-1400; Middle English: smaragd < Latin smaragdīnus < Greek smarágdinos, equivalent to smáragd (os) emerald + -inos -ine

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Anthophilous
 
Pronunciation: /anˈTHäfələs/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) attracted by or living among flowers.
2) feeding on flowers, as certain insects.
3) (of insects or other animals) frequenting flowers.
 
Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek anthos + English -philous

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Analphabetic
 
Pronunciation: (an-al-fuh-BET-ik)
 
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) Illiterate.
2) Not alphabetical.
3) Representing sounds by composite signs rather than by single letters or symbols.
4) An illiterate person.
 
Etymology: From Greek analphabetos (not knowing the alphabet), from an- (not) + alphabetos (alphabet), from alpha + beta. Earliest documented use: 1876.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Logomachy
 
Pronunciation: /lōˈɡäməkē/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) an argument about words
 
Etymology: mid 16th century: from Greek logomakhia, from logos ‘word’ + -makhia ‘fighting.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Cacoethes
 
Pronunciation: /ˌkakəˈwēT͟Hēz/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable.
 
Etymology: Mid 16th century: via Latin from Greek kakoēthes ‘ill-disposed’, from kakos ‘bad’ + ēthos ‘disposition’.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Laconic
 
Pronunciation: (lə-ˈkä-nik)
 
Defintion: (noun)
 
1) brief and to the point; effectively cut short
 
2) (of a person, speech, or style of writing) using very few words
 
Etymology:
 
mid 16th century (in the sense ‘Laconian’): via Latin from Greek Lakōnikos, from Lakōn ‘Laconia, Sparta,’ the Spartans being known for their terse speech.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Hemidemisemiquaver
 
Pronunciation: (hem-ee-dem-ee-SEM-ee-kway-vuhr)
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) A sixty-fourth note.
 
Etymology:
 
From Greek hemi- (half) + French demi- (half) + Latin semi- (half) + quaver (an eighth note), from Middle English quaveren (to shake or tremble). Earliest documented use: 1853.

Fun Fact of the Day

Fun Fact of the Day:
 
The word “magnesium” comes from the name of the Greek region Magnesia, where compounds of this element occur naturally.
 
Milk of Magnesia, which works as a laxative and to treat indigestion, is a compound of magnesium, hydrogen and oxygen molecules.
 
Another home remedy owed to magnesium? Epsom salts, otherwise known as magnesium sulfate. The name “Epsom” comes from a spring in England where the salts occur naturally.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Oligopsony
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a market situation in which each of a few buyers exerts a disproportionate influence on the market
 
2) a state of the market in which only a small number of buyers exists for a product.
 
Etymology:
 
Circa 1940; Oligopsony derives from the combining form olig-, meaning “few,” and the Greek noun opsōnia—”the purchase of victuals”—which is ultimately from the combination of opson, “food,” and ōneisthai, “to buy.”