Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Cramoisy
 
Pronunciation: /KRAM-oi-zee, kruh-MOI-/
 
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) Of a crimson color.
2) Crimson cloth.
 
Etymology: From French cramoisi, from Spanish carmesi, from Arabic qirmizi (of kermes). Earliest documented use: 1423.
Advertisements

On this Day in History

On this Day in History in 1905: French Dufaux brothers test helicopter.
 
On this Day in History in 1896: Stamasia Portrisi is 1st woman to win a marathon (5:30 in Athens).
 
On this Day in History in 1892: George C Blickensderfer patents portable typewriter.
 
On this Day in History in 1877: Catcher’s mask 1st used in a baseball game.
 
On this Day in History in 1961: Soviet Yuri Alexeyevich Gagarin became first man to orbit the Earth.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bourgeois
 
Pronunciation: (boor-ZHWAH, BOOR-zhwah)
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) A member of the middle class.
2) One who exhibits behavior in conformity to the conventions of the middle class.
3) In Marxist theory, a member of the capitalist class.
4) Belonging to the middle class.
5) Marked by a concern for respectability and material interests.
6) Mediocre or unimaginative: lacking artistic refinement.
 
Etymology: From French bourgeois, from Latin burgus (fortress, fortified town), from West Germanic burg. Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhergh- (high) which is also the source of iceberg, belfry, borough, burg, burglar, bourgeois, fortify, and force. Earliest documented use: 1564.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fanfaronade
 
Pronunciation: /ˌfanˌferəˈnād/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) bragging; bravado; bluster.
2) arrogant or boastful talk.
 
Etymology: mid 17th century: from French fanfaronnade, from fanfaron ‘braggart,’ from fanfare

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Puce
 
Pronunciation: /pyoos/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) a dark red or brownish purple color.
2) of a dark or brownish purple.
 
Etymology: late 18th century: from French, literally ‘flea(-color),’ from Latin pulex, pulic- .

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Coze
 
Pronunciation: /kohz/
 
Definition: (noun, verb)
 
1) a friendly talk; a chat.
2) to converse in a friendly way; chat.
3) an intimate friendly chat
4) a state of comfort and warmth
5) to chat in an intimate and friendly manner
 
Etymology: Coze came to English in the 1820s from French causer “to chat,” from Old French “to reason, expound.” Ultimately coze derives from Latin causārī “to plead a cause, plead as an excuse.”

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Colporteur
 
Pronunciation: /ˈkälpôrdər,ˌkälpôrˈtər/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a person who peddles books, newspapers, or other writings, especially bibles and religious tracts
 
Etymology: late 18th century: French, from the verb colporter, probably an alteration of comporter, from Latin comportare ‘carry with one.’