On this Day in History

On this Day in History in 1066: Halley’s Comet sparks English monk to predict country will be destroyed.
 
On this Day in History in 1184 B.C.: The Greeks enter Troy using the Trojan Horse (traditional date).

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Grimalkin
 
Pronunciation: /grih-MAWL-kin/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a domestic cat; especially.
2) an old female cat.
3) a spiteful old woman.
 
Etymology: late 16th century: from gray1 + Malkin (nickname for the given name Matilda ).

On this Day in History

On this Day in History in 1795: France adopts the metre as the basic measure of length.
 
On this Day in History in 1827: English chemist John Walker invents wooden matches.
 
On this Day in History in 1906: Mount Vesuvius erupts and devastates Naples.
 
On this Day in History in 1930: The first steel columns were set for the Empire State Building.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Coze
 
Pronunciation: /kohz/
 
Definition: (noun, verb)
 
1) a friendly talk; a chat.
2) to converse in a friendly way; chat.
3) an intimate friendly chat
4) a state of comfort and warmth
5) to chat in an intimate and friendly manner
 
Etymology: Coze came to English in the 1820s from French causer “to chat,” from Old French “to reason, expound.” Ultimately coze derives from Latin causārī “to plead a cause, plead as an excuse.”

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Anthophilous
 
Pronunciation: /anˈTHäfələs/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) attracted by or living among flowers.
2) feeding on flowers, as certain insects.
3) (of insects or other animals) frequenting flowers.
 
Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek anthos + English -philous

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Equivoque
 
Pronunciation: /ˈekwəvōk,ˈēkwəˌvōk/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) an equivocal term; an ambiguous expression.
2) a play on words; pun.
3) double meaning; ambiguity.
 
Etymology: Equivoque entered English in the late 1300s, and was originally spelled equivoc. It derives from the Late Latin term aequivocus meaning “ambiguous.”