Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bourgeois
 
Pronunciation: (boor-ZHWAH, BOOR-zhwah)
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) A member of the middle class.
2) One who exhibits behavior in conformity to the conventions of the middle class.
3) In Marxist theory, a member of the capitalist class.
4) Belonging to the middle class.
5) Marked by a concern for respectability and material interests.
6) Mediocre or unimaginative: lacking artistic refinement.
 
Etymology: From French bourgeois, from Latin burgus (fortress, fortified town), from West Germanic burg. Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhergh- (high) which is also the source of iceberg, belfry, borough, burg, burglar, bourgeois, fortify, and force. Earliest documented use: 1564.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Gimcrack
 
Pronunciation: /JIM-krak/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) a showy object of little use or value : gewgaw
2) a cheap and showy ornament; a knickknack.
3) flimsy or poorly made but deceptively attractive.
 
Etymology: Middle English gibecrake, of unknown origin. Originally a noun, the term denoted some kind of inlaid work in wood, later a fanciful notion or mechanical contrivance, hence a knickknack.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Nescience
 
Pronunciation: \ˈne-sh(ē-)ənt, ˈnē-, -sē-ənt\
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) lack of knowledge; ignorance.
2) agnosticism.
 
Etymology: Late Middle English: from Latin nescient- ‘not knowing’, from the verb nescire, from ne- ‘not’ + scire ‘know’.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Puce
 
Pronunciation: /pyoos/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) a dark red or brownish purple color.
2) of a dark or brownish purple.
 
Etymology: late 18th century: from French, literally ‘flea(-color),’ from Latin pulex, pulic- .

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bobbery
 
Pronunciation: /BOB-uh-ree/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) Squabble; commotion; confusion.
2) A disturbance; brawl.
3) (Hunting) Also called: bobbery pack a mixed pack of hunting dogs, often not belonging to any of the hound breeds
4) a noisy commotion
5) noisy or excitable
 
Etymology: A corruption of Hindi “bap re” (literally, oh father!), an exclamation of surprise, grief, etc., from bap (father) + re (oh). Earliest documented use: 1816.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Miscible
 
Pronunciation: /MIS-uh-buhl/
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Capable of being mixed together.
2) (of liquids) forming a homogeneous mixture when added together.
3) capable of mixing in any ratio without separation of two phases.
 
Etymology: From Latin miscere (to mix), ultimately from the Indo-European root meik- (to mix), which is also the source of mix, miscellaneous, meddle, medley, promiscuous, melee, mustang, admix, immix, and panmixia. Earliest documented use: 1570.

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Bromidic
 
Pronunciation: (broh-MID-ik)
 
Definition: (adj)
 
1) Commonplace; trite.
2) pertaining or proper to a platitude; being a bromide
3) lacking in originality
4) given to uttering bromides
5) dull and tiresome but with pretensions of significance or originality
 
Etymology: From the former use of bromide compounds as sedatives. Bromine got its name from the Greek bromos (stench) due to its strong smell. Earliest documented use: 1906.