Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Drupe
 
Pronunciation: /droop/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) Any fruit, as a peach, cherry, plum, etc., consisting of an outer skin, a usually pulpy and succulent middle layer, and a hard and woody inner shell usually enclosing a single seed.
 
Etymology: mid 18th century: from Latin drupa ‘overripe olive,’ from Greek druppa ‘olive.’
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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Puce
 
Pronunciation: /pyoos/
 
Definition: (noun, adj)
 
1) a dark red or brownish purple color.
2) of a dark or brownish purple.
 
Etymology: late 18th century: from French, literally ‘flea(-color),’ from Latin pulex, pulic- .

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Colporteur
 
Pronunciation: /ˈkälpôrdər,ˌkälpôrˈtər/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a person who peddles books, newspapers, or other writings, especially bibles and religious tracts
 
Etymology: late 18th century: French, from the verb colporter, probably an alteration of comporter, from Latin comportare ‘carry with one.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Etiolate
 
Definition: (verb)
 
1) to cause to become weakened or sickly; drain of color or vigor.
2) to cause (a plant) to whiten or grow pale by excluding light: to etiolate celery.
3) (of plants) to whiten or grow pale through lack of light.
 
Etymology:
 
Etiolate comes from the French verb étioler “to make pale, etiolate (plants),” probably derivative of a Norman French dialect form of standard French éteule, from Old French estoble, estuble “stubble,” from Latin stipula “stalk, straw.” The word entered English in the 18th century.