Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Biennial
 
Pronunciation: \bī-ˈe-nē-əl\
 
Definition: (adj, noun)
 
1) occurring every second year
2) having a life cycle lasting two seasons
3) an event that occurs every two years
4) (botany) a plant having a life cycle that normally takes two seasons from germination to death to complete; flowering biennials usually bloom and fruit in the second season
 
Etymology: Early 17th century: from Latin biennis (from bi- ‘twice’ + annus ‘year’) + -al.
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Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Fanfaronade
 
Pronunciation: /ˌfanˌferəˈnād/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) bragging; bravado; bluster.
2) arrogant or boastful talk.
 
Etymology: mid 17th century: from French fanfaronnade, from fanfaron ‘braggart,’ from fanfare

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Merkin
 
Pronunciation: /ˈmərkən/
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) an artificial covering of hair for the pubic area
 
Etymology: Early 17th century: apparently a variant of dialect malkin, diminutive of Malde (early form of the given name Maud).

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Onus
 
Pronunciation: OH-nuss
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) burden
2) a disagreeable necessity : obligation
3) blame
4) stigma
 
Etymology: mid 17th century: from Latin, literally ‘load or burden.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Jurisprudence
Polish Translation: prawoznawstwo
Pronunciation: ˌ/jo͝orəˈspro͞odns/
Definition: (noun)
1) the science or philosophy of law.
2) a body or system of laws.
3) a department of law: medical jurisprudence.
Etymology:
early 17th century: from late Latin jurisprudentia, from Latin jus, jur- ‘law’ + prudentia ‘knowledge.’

Word of the Day

Word of the Day: Maelstrom
 
Definition: (noun)
 
1) a powerful often violent whirlpool sucking in objects within a given radius
 
2) something resembling a maelstrom in turbulence
 
Etymology:
 
late 17th century: from early modern Dutch (denoting a mythical whirlpool supposed to exist in the Arctic Ocean, west of Norway), from maalen ‘grind, whirl’ + stroom ‘stream.’